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The movement to deploy high-speed broadband and develop smart city strategies is spreading across the country. As technology progresses, so do the necessities of everyday life, creating a new reality that fiber optic infrastructure is the new utility and something every home must have. Telemedicine, telecommuting, streaming video content, educational research, security surveillance systems, and the overall Internet of Things are all leading us to the ultimate goal of faster connectivity and better communications.

The Time Is Now for San Francisco Municipal Fiber, Says Report

The San Francisco Municipal Fiber Blue Ribbon Panel, published the Why Fiber? Should San Francisco Deploy a Fiber Broadband Network? report on June 19, in an effort to weigh the potential benefits against the costs. (Spoiler alert: They conclude that San Francisco should build out a fiber network.)

Author: Tom Mullen
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Google Fiber says microtrenching, self-installation will enhance network installation

"We've seen a big rise, just in the last few months, of people choosing just our internet-only offering, just wanting 1,000 megabits then they will choose their own over-the-top streaming services where they can personalize and package it to their viewing, their entertainment needs," said McCray, according to a UBB 2020 report. "There's a definite trend that consumers want to be able to pick and choose and package things and not be told by service providers how to do it.”

McCray added that the internet-only purchases indicate that OTT video will be the more dominant viewing mode.

Author: Tom Mullen
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America’s two biggest cable companies just struck a deal. Here’s how it will affect you.

Maybe you've heard: Charter Communications is teaming up with Comcast. 

Essentially, it's a deal by cable giants to shield their early investments in an industry they're just beginning to explore. But this detente, while it may seem like a small announcement, has some important implications for cellphone service, television and online media. Here's why it's such a big deal.

Author: Tom Mullen
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Verizon: We’re Doubling Down on Fiber Broadband, Just Don’t Call it Fios

“Fiber is basically the nervous system of the networks of the future,” Malady said and Verizon is making big investments in it. He cited recent announcements with Corning and other fiber suppliers that Malady said has the carrier buying enough fiber to string to “Mars and back.”

This doubling-down in fiber is not driven by expanding Fios. It’s driven by the need to densify Verizon’s network for 5G. But FTTP applications will be a benefit of this densification. Because of 5G, Verizon will need to feed small cells located at approximately 1,000-foot intervals in urban applications.

Author: Tom Mullen
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Verizon and Sacramento want to make a deal. What’s in it for you?

Wireless giant Verizon and the city of Sacramento want to make a deal.

Mayor Darrell Steinberg on Thursday will announce a plan in which the city would give Verizon fast permitting and access to city pipes for cable in exchange for a next-generation internet backbone and amenities such as free wifi at 27 parks.

Details of the proposed contract were not available Wednesday, but a memo about the public-private partnership said Verizon would get free use of 101 small cell towers for 10 years, and low-cost rates for 5G cell locations when that technology becomes commercially available in coming years.

Author: Tom Mullen
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Comcast launches gigabit internet service in Oregon, Washington

Comcast turned on its new, superfast gigabit internet service across Oregon and Washington on Wednesday. It's the region's broadest rollout yet for a speedier, pricier tier of residential online access.

A gigabit is 1,000 megabits per second, 40 times faster than the federal broadband standard, quick enough to download an entire high-definition movie in 40 seconds. Few households need gig connections now - they're faster than many online services and home electronics can accommodate.

Author: Tom Mullen
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Comcast launches gigabit internet in Colorado at a 50 percent discount from prior gigabit price

Comcast begins rolling out a new version of gigabit internet service on Tuesday to Colorado customers that cuts the price of a similar broadband service nearly by half.

That’s because the new gigabit service, which is around $160 a month, uses a customer’s existing coaxial cable lines. Comcast’s original 2 gigabit service, which launched in Denver two years ago, uses fiber-optic lines, requires professional installation and costs around $300 per month.

Author: Tom Mullen
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Research: Global Fiber Broadband Penetration Surpasses DSL, On Track for 1 Billion Connections

China and the U.S., respectively, are the two largest fixed broadband markets by far, accounting for 46.9 percent of the worldwide total in 2016. China alone accounts for 34.7 percent of the global total, and fixed broadband connections increased 45.7 percent in 2016 as Chinese providers continue to follow through on the central government’s Broadband China initiative.

Author: Tom Mullen
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Cable lobby conducts survey, finds that Americans want net neutrality

About 61 percent of respondents either "strongly" or "somewhat" support net neutrality rules that say ISPs "cannot block, throttle, or prioritize certain content on the Internet." Only 18 percent oppose net neutrality, as the rest don't know what it is or had no opinion.

Full results of the NCTA survey conducted with Morning Consult are available here.

Author: Tom Mullen
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Sprint sues government over elimination of broadband price caps

The FCC last month voted to eliminate price caps for the so-called Business Data Services (BDS) that are offered by incumbent phone companies throughout the country. The FCC decision to which Sprint and Windstream object only eliminated price caps in "competitive" markets, but it uses a standard that deems many local markets competitive even when there's only one broadband provider.

Author: Tom Mullen
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